Saturday, 23 October 2021

Masses for Sunday 24th October

Bartimaeus calls out “Jesus, Son of David. Take pity on me!”


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK



Sunday 24th October.  30th week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Monday  2pm Requiem Mass for Seámus McLoughlin

Tuesday ---

Wednesday ---

Thursday  ---

Friday ---

Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am



Sunday 31st October

Solemnity of All Saints
Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Saturday, 16 October 2021

Twenty ninth Sunday of the Year. Sunday 17th October.

 

Feast of Pope St John Paul II this week on Friday


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK



Sunday 17th October.  29th week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Monday  Mass at 9.30am

Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Wednesday Mass at 9.30am

Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm

Friday Mass at 9.30am

Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am



Sunday 24th October

30th week Year B
Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Saturday, 2 October 2021

Masses for Rosary Sunday

 

This Sunday is Rosary Sunday

reminding us to pray the Rosary 

and so meditate on the Saving Mysteries of our Faith

and in commemoration of the 

Christian victory over the Turks at the Battle of Lepanto

despite overwhelming odds.


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK



Sunday 3rd October.  27th week Year B. Rosary Sunday

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Monday  Mass at 9.30am

Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Wednesday Mass at 9.30am

Thursday  --- No Mass today

Friday --- No Mass today

Saturday --- No Mass today



Sunday 10th October

28th week Year B
Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Friday, 24 September 2021

Parish updates

Wednesday is the Feast of the Archangels

This coming week sees the feast of the Archangels. May they protect the Church in these difficult times.

Masses as usual this week. Please note that our REFRESHMENTS after each of the Sunday Masses have now resumed. After consulting with parishioners and those who provide the refreshments, we decided that it was time. Considering theatres are open and back to full capacity, just like football games, with no obligatory masks or social distancing, the church is by comparison, a more more managed environment and so probably safer than a trip to the supermarket. We await a full return of all our people to Sunday Mass.


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK



Sunday 26th September.  26th week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Monday  Mass at 9.30am

Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Wednesday Mass at 9.30am

Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm

Friday Mass at 9.30am

Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am



Sunday 3rd October

27th week Year B
Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Tuesday, 7 September 2021

Stations of the Cross Appeal - update

 
The Stations of the Cross for 

St Peter's School 

have arrived - in two very large and heavy boxes!

They are a good size (20") in height to be able to make an impact, 

so we are very pleased.


The new term began yesterday 

welcoming the boys back both new and old!

Here, playing pétanque in the old orchard, 

which is where we hope to set the Stations up.

There was another donation yesterday as well 

- given anonymously - thank you.

That has taken us to 57% of the cost of £2,500, 

which is greatly appreciated.

The fund is still open 

and you can help us make this place of prayer by giving 

HERE!

Thank you for any gift, large or small.

Saturday, 4 September 2021

Sunday Masses

 

This week, on Friday, sees the feast day of local man, 

St Ambrose Barlow.

For those who live locally, you will be aware of the road resurfacing this week along the whole of Stanifield Lane that has led to some disruption. I've checked with the workmen and, although the work is not quite complete, the road is fully accessible this Sunday. See you at Mass!

MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Sunday 5th September.  23rd week Year B

Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  Mass at 9.30am


Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon


Wednesday Mass at 9.30am


Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm


Friday Mass at 9.30am


Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am


Sunday 5th September

24th week Year B

Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Saturday, 28 August 2021

Masses this week at St Catherine Labouré

Friday is the Feast of Pope St Gregory the Great


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Sunday 29th August.  22nd week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Monday  Mass at 9.30am

Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Wednesday Mass at 9.30am

Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm

Friday Mass at 9.30am

Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am



Sunday 5th September

23rd week Year B
Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Wednesday, 25 August 2021

Stations of the Cross Appeal. 50% there!


Go past the hollyhocks... turn left... turn right... and there begin the Stations of the Cross!

Well, not yet. But that is where St Peter's International School in France is hoping to be able to set up a Way of the Cross. 

The great news is that our giving campaign has just reached the half way mark. So we have raised £1,250. If you would like to be part of this project to install these beautiful Della Robbia style stations, each 20" high, please click on the link below.

Thanks to our wonderful donors - the small and the large amounts all add up!





 

Saturday, 21 August 2021

Stations of the Cross Appeal - Update


We've now received 40% of the total amount, which is really great in just in few days.

We hope to install them throughout the old orchard at St Peter's International College, pictured here with an air balloon going over last week. It is just beyond Sacré Coeur House, pictured below.

 

Many thanks to the donors.

You can donate using the QR code here
 or by going to the crowdfunding page 








Twenty First Sunday at St Catherine's parish

 
This week sees the celebration of two feasts with local connections not far from our little parish.

Monday is the Feast of St John Wall of Preston, sent to his death on the charges that he had said Mass, heard confessions, and received converts into the Church.

Thursday is the Feast of Blessed Dominic Barberi, "Apostle of the English" buried at the former Passionist church of Sutton Monastery in St Helen's.


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Sunday 22nd August.  21st week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  Mass at 9.30am

Requiem Mass for Margaret Brennan at 11am

Wednesday Mass at 9.30am

Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm

Friday Mass at 9.30am

Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am


Sunday 22nd August

21st week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Wednesday, 18 August 2021

Stations of the Cross

 
STATIONS OF THE CROSS 

for

As many of you will know, the last months have seen me heavily involved as one of the co-founders, of this wonderful but challenging, new enterprise. The school grounds at St Peter's International College include a former orchard where we want to place a set of outdoor Stations of the Cross for formal use in Lent but for the boys to be able to use whenever they wish. This part of the campus is used for occasional outdoor activities but also a place where people can walk, talk or relax - and also pray. 

As well as adding a focus for the area, these beautiful Stations of the Cross in the Della Robbia style will help to Christianize the school environment and proudly proclaim our Catholic Faith. A set of outdoor Stations that is both large enough to be seen and will cope with the weather is not an easy thing to find but we hope these will be seen and used for many a year to come. Each one in this set is 20" high and the cost for the whole set is £2,500. This is quite a sum but we believe that the benefit is well worth it. 

When the site was bought just last year, the buildings were just an empty shell, so inside and out, everything has had to be sourced to help us build the school community and create a a suitable environment. Thank you for anything you might be able to give to assist us in this project. God bless you.

We are making an appeal through CrowdFunding. If you feel able to help in any way, large or small, then just click RIGHT HERE!





Saturday, 14 August 2021

The grass is greener...

I've just returned from St Peter's International School in France, lending a helping hand as the college prepares for the new intake in September.  As the Covid problems become more manageable, the school is looking forward to welcoming more visitors to come and see the great work being done there. 


I'm posting these two before and after photos, taken exactly a year between one another on this day. In some ways, the front Quad doesn't look much different - though the grass is certainly greener!

Actually, in the first photo the buildings are still looking a little tatty and the place is awash with workers scrambling to get the place habitable. This year, there's a little more order and, like the avenue of miniature yew trees, a sense of order and incipient growth.

On this eve of the wonderful Feast of Our Lady's Assumption I will offer a prayer for her continuing protection for a project to provide a truly Catholic education in these days when it is needed more than ever. May I ask you to do the same for us?




Masses at St Catherine's this week

 

MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Solemnity of the Assumption of Mary into Heaven.

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  Mass at 9.30am


Tuesday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon


Wednesday Mass at 9.30am


Thursday  Novena & Benediction at 7pm


Friday Mass at 9.30am


Saturday Traditional Latin Mass at 12 noon

Confessions before 11.30am - 11.50am



Sunday 22nd August

21st week Year B

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Sunday, 8 August 2021

Boarding School: the new and the old at St Peter's

 

I've ventured back to France to St Peter's College, in beautiful Saint-Pierre-de-Maillé, to help out with the ongoing renovations, as well as pupil and teacher recruitment. Most of which are well in hand but there are no slow days.

The boys rooms that underwent a total refurbishment last summer have been spruced up and the outside of the accommodation wing has now been repainted. All looking rather smart. 

Each room accommodates two boys who share an en-suite shower room. These open out onto a covered walkway and the front Quad (motel style, for those who live in the States!) All a long way the from old-fashioned dormitories of yesteryear!

As I explained in a previous post, the main building, Maison St André, is a bit of a building site at the moment, as it is further opened up, with much help from a generous donor, for whom we give thanks to the Lord. We have been blest with both benefactors and investors who have enabled so much good work to come to fruition. They are remembered each year at a special Mass.

We are still on a drive, right up to the last day of summer, for pupil recruitment to enable us to meet our target figures for this coming year. 

From the many inquiries that have come in, it's a certainty that Covid concerns are still at the forefront of people's minds and many parents are understandably leaving it until the last minute to make final decisions. 

If you are one of those parents and looking for help in making a decision, do contact the School via the Principal, easily contactable via the website: 

Saint Peter's International College, France (stpetersfr.com)

You can also learn more on our Facebook page


I've included the above photo as one of my wide angle views that didn't go according to plan!
Still, it would be an interesting architectural reworking
but I don't think we can afford it at the moment!

Friday, 6 August 2021

Tradtiones Custodes and parish news


Following the publication of Traditionis custodes (Guardians of the tradition), the motu proprio by Pope Francis on 16 July 2021, giving diocesan bishops wider powers over the celebration of the Traditional Latin Mass, Archbishop Malcolm as granted permission for St Catherine's to continue with the same number and times of Masses we have had over the past several years.
In a normal week (not this week!) this has been 
Tuesdays and Saturdays at 12 noon and Sundays at 11.30am.


MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK

Sunday 8th August

Nineteenth Sunday. Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  ---

Tuesday ---

Wednesday ---

Thursday  ---

Friday ---

Saturday ---


Sunday 15th August

Solemnity of the Assumption of Mary into Heaven.

 Mass at 8.30am & 10am



Some sad news. One of our parishioners, daily Mass goer Margaret Brennan died this week.

Please pray for her family in their grief and for the repose of her soul.

Her Requiem will be at 11am on Tuesday 24th August.

Eternal rest grant unto her, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon her.

Sunday, 25 July 2021

“Francis, go and rebuild my Church.”

“Francis, go and rebuild my Church.”

These were the words St Francis heard Our Blessed Lord speak to his heart as he gazed on the crucified image in the ruined church of St Damiano. The task of rebuilding the Church is always with us and St Peter's International College is attempting to do just that, in rebuilding the 200 year old abandoned Convent founded by St André-Hubert Fournet for the new Congregation of the Sisters of the Cross, Sisters of St Andrew Cross, in 1807. St André, together with the first Superior St Elizabeth Bichier, established the Congregation for the care of the poor and the instruction children. 


The School started up last year but the main building, St Andrew's House, was not able to be used, as it needed much in the way of being brought up to code for a building in public use. This summer, thanks to some very generous benefactors, work has begun on this historic building. It's not fancy inside (it was built for holy nuns!) but is it spacious and has an imposing presence from the outside. As well as further classrooms and offices, it will provide space for a large games room for the boys, a library (yet to be fitted out) and most importantly, a professional kitchen. All of this can't be done at once, as funds will not allow, but, as St Francis said, “Start by doing what is necessary, then what is possible, and suddenly you are doing the impossible.”


When the school opened last year, many times was heard the refrain, "That's going to be impossible!" But day by day we do what is necessary to rebuild this little corner of God's Church, following one of the original charisms of the Sisters who first worked there under the inspiration of St André - the education of young people in the FAITH. The same Faith and the same Mass that gave them courage is alive in the college today and St Peter's thanks God most especially at this time for the generous donors who have helped to rebuild what seemed impossible. It has been a long hard year but we've had little choice other than to follow St Francis' advice, “Be patient in trials, watchful in prayer, and never cease working.”


We hope to turn the building sites in the pictures above into functioning spaces like this existing classroom. If you feel the prompting of God's Holy Spirit to be a part of rebuilding God's Church for the young people who will have to lead the Church in the future, please consider donating to this great endeavor. Like St Francis, we set off with little more than our trust in God but have been joined in the journey by man who contribute in prayer and in financial support. You are invited to join us in that journey “The journey is essential to the dream.”


St Francis had a joyful spirit, a childlike joy in the Faith; a complete trust in God; a deep devotion to the Mass and Church and a desire to preach the Gospel, even in the most unlikely places (at the court of the Sultan of Egypt, for example!) This is the Faith we want to pass on to the next generations of Catholics.

To learn more or to donate - any amount large or small, contact me via the usual channels or the school directly via the website.



“For it is in giving that we receive.”









Saturday, 24 July 2021

Gregorian Mass Bouquet

 

Mass of St. Gregory

by Raffaellino del Garbo 1501

in the Ringling Museum of Art, Florida.

Depicting Pope St Gregory the Great saying Mass when a vision of Christ as the Man of Sorrows has appeared on the altar in front of him, in response to the Pope's prayers for a sign to convince a doubter of the doctrine of transubstantiation .

The Chaplain at St Peter's College (along with other clergy friends of the College) is now offering the possibility of a Gregorian Mass Bouquet, as well as individual Mass intentions. This is a beautiful and practical way of supporting the spirituality and pastoral care of the College, helping to educate young men in in atmosphere permeated with the riches of our Catholic Faith.

Gregorian Masses are a series of Holy Masses traditionally offered on 30 consecutive days for a deceased loved one. They are offered for one individual soul.

The custom of offering Gregorian Masses for a particular soul recognizes that few people are immediately ready for heaven after death, and that, through the infinite intercessory power of Christ’s sacrifice, made present in Holy Mass, a soul can be continually perfected in grace and enabled to enter finally into the union with the Most Holy Trinity – our God, Who is Love Itself.

Gregorian Masses take their name from Saint Gregory the Great, who was sovereign Pontiff from 590 to 604. St. Gregory the Great contributed to the spread of the pious practice of having these Masses celebrated for the deliverance of the souls from purgatory. In his Dialogues, he tells us that he had Masses on thirty consecutive days offered for the repose of the soul of Justus, a monk who had died in the convent of St. Andrew in Rome. At the end of the thirtieth Mass, the deceased appeared to one of his fellow monks and announced that he had been delivered from the flames of Purgatory.


If you would like to have a Mass bouquet offered, you can do so through the College website:

College Community — Saint Peter's International College, France (stpetersfr.com)

Click on "Foundation" and a drop down menu will appear for Mass Intentions.


Seventeenth Sunday of the Year

 

MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Seventeenth Sunday. Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  9.30am Mass. 

Tuesday 12 noon Mass. 

Wednesday 12 noon Requiem Mass for Jimmy Maher. 

Thursday  ---

Friday ---

Saturday ---

Eighteenth Sunday. Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Friday, 23 July 2021

Cardinal Burke and the Moto Proprio


Cardinal Burke has issued a statement with his thoughts on the recent Moto Proprio.

They are measured and thorough and reflect his own experience of the many people he has met who are attached to the Usus Antiquior, (including me! here and here).


Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke 

Statement on the Motu Proprio «Traditionis Custodes on July 22nd 2021

Many faithful – laity, ordained and consecrated – have expressed to me the profound distress which the Motu Proprio «Traditionis Custodes» has brought them. Those who are attached to the Usus Antiquior (More Ancient Usage) [UA], what Pope Benedict XVI called the Extraordinary Form, of the Roman Rite are deeply disheartened by the severity of the discipline which the Motu Proprio imposes and offended by the language it employs to describe them, their attitudes and their conduct. As a member of the faithful, who also has an intense bond with the UA, I fully share in their sentiments of profound sorrow.

As a Bishop of the Church and as a Cardinal, in communion with the Roman Pontiff and with a particular responsibility to assist him in his pastoral care and governance of the universal Church, I offer the following observations:

1.  In a preliminary way, it must be asked why the Latin or official text of the Motu Proprio has not yet been published. As far as I know, the Holy See promulgated the text in Italian and English versions, and, afterwards, in German and Spanish translations. Since the English version is called a translation, it must be assumed that the original text is in Italian. If such be the case, there are translations of significant texts in the English version which are not coherent with the Italian version. In Article 1, the important Italian adjective, “unica”, is translated into English as “unique”, instead of “only.” In Article 4, the important Italian verb, “devono”, is translated into English as “should”, instead of “must.”

2.  First of all, it is important to establish, in this and the following two observations (nos. 3 and 4), the essence of what the Motu Proprio contains. It is apparent from the severity of the document that Pope Francis issued the Motu Proprio to address what he perceives to be a grave evil threatening the unity of the Church, namely the UA. According to the Holy Father, those who worship according to this usage make a choice which rejects “the Church and her institutions in the name of what is called the ‘true Church’,” a choice which “contradicts communion and nurtures the divisive tendency … against which the Apostle Paul so vigorously reacted.”

3.  Clearly, Pope Francis considers the evil so great that he took immediate action, not informing Bishops in advance and not even providing for the usual vacatio legis, a period of time between the promulgation of a law and its taking force. The vacatio legis provides the faithful and especially the Bishops time to study the new legislation regarding the worship of God, the most important aspect of their life in the Church, with a view to its implementation. The legislation, in fact, contains many elements that require study regarding its application.

4.  What is more, the legislation places restrictions on the UA, which signal its ultimate elimination, for example, the prohibition of the use of a parish church for worship according to the UA and the establishment of certain days for such worship. In his letter to the Bishops of the world, Pope Francis indicates two principles which are to guide the Bishops in the implementation of the Motu Proprio. The first principle is “to provide for the good of those who are rooted in the previous form of celebration and need to return in due time to the Roman Rite promulgated by Saints Paul VI and John Paul II.” The second principle is “to discontinue the erection of new personal parishes tied more to the desire and wishes of individual priests than to the real need of the ‘holy People of God’.”

5.  Seemingly, the legislation is directed to the correction of an aberration principally attributable to the “the desire and wishes” of certain priests. In that regard, I must observe, especially in the light of my service as a Diocesan Bishop, it was not the priests who, because of their desires, urged the faithful to request the Extraordinary Form. In fact, I shall always be deeply grateful to the many priests who, notwithstanding their already heavy commitments, generously served the faithful who legitimately requested the UA. The two principles cannot help but communicate to devout faithful who have a deep appreciation and attachment to the encounter with Christ through the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite that they suffer from an aberration which can be tolerated for a time but must ultimately be eradicated.

6.  From whence comes the severe and revolutionary action of the Holy Father? The Motu Proprio and the Letter indicate two sources: first, “the wishes expressed by the episcopate” through “a detailed consultation of the bishops” conducted by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in 2020, and, second, “the opinion of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.” Regarding the responses to the “detailed consultation” or “questionnaire” sent to the Bishops, Pope Francis writes to the Bishops: “The responses reveal a situation that preoccupies and saddens me, and persuades me of the need to intervene.”

7.  Regarding the sources, is it to be supposed that the situation which preoccupies and saddens the Roman Pontiff exists generally in the Church or only in certain places? Given the importance attributed to the “detailed consultation” or “questionnaire,” and the gravity of the matter it was treating, it would seem essential that the results of the consultation be made public, along with the indication of its scientific character. In the same way, if the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith was of the opinion that such a revolutionary measure must be taken, it would seemingly have prepared an Instruction or similar document to address it.

8.  The Congregation enjoys the expertise and long experience of certain officials – first, serving in the Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei and then in the Fourth Section of the Congregation – who have been charged to treat questions regarding the UA. One must ask whether the “opinion of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith” reflected the consultation of those with the greatest knowledge of the faithful devoted to the UA?

9.  Regarding the perceived grave evil constituted by the UA, I have a wide experience over many years and in many different places with the faithful who regularly worship God according to the UA. In all honesty, I must say that these faithful, in no way, reject “the Church and her institutions in the name of what is called the ‘true Church’.” Neither have I found them out of communion with the Church or divisive within the Church. On the contrary, they love the Roman Pontiff, their Bishops and priests, and, when others have made the choice of schism, they have wanted always to remain in full communion with the Church, faithful to the Roman Pontiff, often at the cost of great suffering. They, in no way, ascribe to a schismatic or sedevacantist ideology.

10.  The Letter accompanying the Motu Proprio states that the UA was permitted by Pope Saint John Paul II and later regulated by Pope Benedict XVI with “the desire to foster the healing of the schism with the movement of Mons. Lefebvre.” The movement in question is the Society of Saint Pius X. While both Roman Pontiffs desired the healing of the schism in question, as should all good Catholics, they also desired to maintain in continuance the UA for those who remained in the full communion of the Church and did not become schismatic. Pope Saint John Paul II showed pastoral charity, in various important ways, to faithful Catholics attached to the UA, for example, granting the indult for the UA but also establishing the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter, a society of apostolic life for priests attached to the UA. In the book, Last Testament in his own words, Pope Benedict XVI responded to the affirmation, “The reauthorization of the Tridentine Mass is often interpreted primarily as a concession to the Society of Saint Pius X,” with these clear and strong words: “This is just absolutely false! It was important for me that the Church is one with herself inwardly, with her own past; that what was previously holy to her is not somehow wrong now” (pp. 201-202). In fact, many who presently desire to worship according to the UA have no experience and perhaps no knowledge of the history and present situation of the Priestly Society of Saint Pius X. They are simply attracted to the holiness of the UA.

11.  Yes, there are individuals and even certain groups which espouse radical positions, even as is the case in other sectors of Church life, but they are, in no way, characteristic of the greater and ever increasing number of faithful who desire to worship God according to the UA. The Sacred Liturgy is not a matter of so-called “Church politics” but the fullest and most perfect encounter with Christ for us in this world. The faithful, in question, among whom are numerous young adults and young married couples with children, encounter Christ, through the UA, Who draws them ever closer to Himself through the reform of their lives and cooperation with the divine grace which flows from His glorious pierced Heart into their hearts. They have no need to make a judgment regarding those who worship God according to the Usus Recentior (the More Recent Usage, what Pope Benedict XVI called the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite) [UR], first promulgated by Pope Saint Paul VI. As one priest, member of an institute of the consecrated life, which serves these faithful, remarked to me: I regularly confess to a priest, according to the UR, and participate, on special occasions, in the Holy Mass according to the UR. He concluded: Why would anyone accuse me of not accepting its validity?

12.  If there are situations of an attitude or practice contrary to the sound doctrine and discipline of the Church, justice demands that they be addressed individually by the pastors of the Church, the Roman Pontiff and the Bishops in communion with him. Justice is the minimum and irreplaceable condition of charity. Pastoral charity cannot be served, if the requirements of justice are not observed.

13.  A schismatic spirit or actual schism are always gravely evil, but there is nothing about the UA which fosters schism. For those of us who knew the UA in the past, like myself, it is a question of an act of worship marked by a centuries-old goodness, truth and beauty. I knew its attraction from my childhood and indeed became very attached to it. Having been privileged to assist the priest as a Mass Server from the time when I was ten years old, I can testify that the UA was a major inspiration of my priestly vocation. For those who have come to the UA for the first time, its rich beauty, especially as it manifests the action of Christ renewing sacramentally His Sacrifice on Calvary through the priest who acts in His person, has drawn them closer to Christ. I know many faithful for whom the experience of Divine Worship according to the UA has strongly inspired their conversion to the Faith or their seeking Full Communion with the Catholic Church. Also, numerous priests who have returned to the celebration of the UA or who have learned it for the first time have told me how deeply it has enriched their priestly spirituality. This is not to mention the saints all along the Christian centuries for whom the UA nourished an heroic practice of the virtues. Some have given their lives to defend the offering of this very form of divine worship.

14.  For myself and for others who have received so many powerful graces through participation in the Sacred Liturgy, according to the UA, it is inconceivable that it could now be characterized as something detrimental to the unity of the Church and to its very life. In this regard, it is difficult to understand the meaning of Article 1 of the Motu Proprio: “The liturgical books promulgated by Saint Paul VI and Saint John Paul II, in conformity with the decrees of Vatican Council II, are the only (unica, in the Italian version which seemingly is the original text) expression of the lex orandi of the Roman Rite.” The UA is a living form of the Roman Rite and has never ceased to be so. From the very time of the promulgation of the Missal of Pope Paul VI, in recognition of the great difference between the UR and the UA, the continued celebration of the Sacraments, according to the UA, was permitted for certain convents and monasteries and also for certain individuals and groups. Pope Benedict XVI, in his Letter to the Bishops of the World, accompanying the Motu Proprio «Summorum Pontificum», made clear that the Roman Missal in use before the Missal of Pope Paul VI, “was never juridically abrogated and, consequently, in principle, was always permitted.”

15.  But can the Roman Pontiff juridically abrogate the UA? The fullness of power (plenitudo potestatis) of the Roman Pontiff is the power necessary to defend and promote the doctrine and discipline of the Church. It is not “absolute power” which would include the power to change doctrine or to eradicate a liturgical discipline which has been alive in the Church since the time of Pope Gregory the Great and even earlier. The correct interpretation of Article 1 cannot be the denial that the UA is an ever-vital expression of “the lex orandi of the Roman Rite.” Our Lord Who gave the wonderful gift of the UA will not permit it to be eradicated from the life of the Church.

16.  It must be remembered that, from a theological point of view, every valid celebration of a sacrament, by the very fact that it is a sacrament, is also, beyond any ecclesiastical legislation, an act of worship and, therefore, also a profession of faith. In that sense, it is not possible to exclude the Roman Missal, according to the UA, as a valid expression of the lex orandi and, therefore, of the lex credendi of the Church. It is a question of an objective reality of divine grace which cannot be changed by a mere act of the will of even the highest ecclesiastical authority.

17.  Pope Francis states in his letter to the Bishops: “Responding to your requests, I take the firm decision to abrogate all the norms, instructions, permissions and customs that precede the present Motu proprio, and declare that the liturgical books promulgated by the saintly Pontiffs Paul VI and John Paul II, in conformity with the decrees of Vatican Council II, constitute the unique [only] expression of the lex orandi of the Roman Rite.” The total abrogation in question, in justice, requires that each individual norm, instruction, permission and custom be studied, to verify that it “contradicts communion and nurtures the divisive tendency … against which the Apostle Paul so vigorously reacted.”

18.  Here, it is necessary to observe that the reform of the Sacred Liturgy carried out by Pope Saint Pius V, in accord with the indications of the Council of Trent, was quite different from what happened after the Second Vatican Council. Pope Saint Pius V essentially put in order the form of the Roman Rite as it had existed already for centuries. Likewise, some ordering of the Roman Rite has been done in the centuries since that time by the Roman Pontiff, but the form of the Rite remained the same. What happened after the Second Vatican Council constituted a radical change in the form of the Roman Rite, with the elimination of many of the prayers, significant ritual gestures, for example, the many genuflections, and the frequent kissing of the altar, and other elements which are rich in the expression of the transcendent reality – the union of heaven with earth – which is the Sacred Liturgy. Pope Paul VI already lamented the situation in a particularly dramatic way by the homily he delivered on the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul in 1972. Pope Saint John Paul II labored throughout his pontificate, and, in particular, during its last years, to address serious liturgical abuses. Both Roman Pontiffs, and Pope Benedict XVI, as well, strove to conform the liturgical reform to the actual teaching of the Second Vatican Council, since the proponents and agents of the abuse invoked the “spirit of the Second Vatican Council” to justify themselves.

19.  Article 6 of the Motu Proprio transfers the competence of institutes of the consecrated life and societies of apostolic life devoted to the UA to the Congregation for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life. The observance of the UA belongs to the very heart of the charism of these institutes and societies. While the Congregation is competent to respond to questions regarding the canon law for such institutes and societies, it is not competent to alter their charism and constitutions, in order to hasten the seemingly desired elimination of the UA in the Church.

There are many other observations to be made, but these seem to be the most important. I hope that they may be helpful to all the faithful and, in particular, to the faithful who worship according to the UA, in responding to the Motu Proprio «Traditionis Custodes» and the accompanying Letter to the Bishops. The severity of these documents naturally generates a profound distress and even sense of confusion and abandonment. I pray that the faithful will not give way to discouragement but will, with the help of divine grace, persevere in their love of the Church and of her pastors, and in their love of the Sacred Liturgy.

In that regard, I urge the faithful, to pray fervently for Pope Francis, the Bishops and priests. At the same time, in accord with can. 212, §3, “[a]ccording to the knowledge, competence, and prestige which they possess, they have the right and even at times the duty to manifest to the sacred pastors their opinion on matters which pertain to the good of the Church and to make their opinion known to the rest of the Christian faithful, without prejudice to the integrity of faith and morals, with reverence toward their pastors, and attentive to common advantage and the dignity of persons.” Finally, in gratitude to Our Lord for the Sacred Liturgy, the greatest gift of Himself to us in the Church, may they continue to safeguard and cultivate the ancient and ever new More Ancient Usage or Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke

Rome, 22 July 2021

Feast of Saint Mary Magdalene, Penitent

Saturday, 17 July 2021

Sixteenth Sunday of the Year. St Catherine's Parish.

 



MASSES AT ST CATHERINE'S THIS WEEK


Sixteenth Sunday. Mass at 8.30am & 10am


Monday  9.30am Mass. 


Tuesday 12 noon Mass. 


Wednesday 9.30am Mass. 


Thursday  7pm

Novena of the Miraculous Medal & Benediction


Friday 9.30am Mass. 


Saturday:   Confessions 11.30m - 11.50am

       12 noon Mass  


Seventeenth Sunday. Mass at 8.30am & 10am

Friday, 16 July 2021

TRADITIONIS CUSTODES

Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, 
celebrating Mass in this little parish, 
in full communion with us, 
with one another 
and with the Successor of St Peter.


Pope Francis today issued a Moto Proprio and accompanying letter, the intent of which is very obviously to limit the celebration of Mass in it's more traditional Form.

Speaking for myself I am truly heartbroken. For me, and for many laity, priests and seminarians, the celebration of this form of the Mass has been a breath of fresh air breathing new life into my soul, sustaining my Christian endeavor against the slings and arrows of everyday life and bringing me closer to Our Lord. In a very tangible way, it has helped to sustain my priesthood.

I am at a complete loss to understand how the Mass I celebrated yesterday - literally - is today forbidden and fenced off with so many bureaucratic regulations, and to make it well nigh impossible for priests not already celebrating it to be able to do so.

For someone like me who loves the Church and has a great devotion to that Church in the living symbol of a HOLY FATHER, the Successor of St Peter, it is not going too far to say that this is devastating. I look to the Pope to be holy and to be a father to me. It grieves my heart to say how hard it is to do so today.

I've celebrated this form of the Mass for many years; it has not led me to despise the Papacy, it has not led me to deny the validity of the Second Vatican Council, it has not led me to teach anyone to despise the Mass of Pope Paul VI, it has not led me to leave my diocese. I am still here in an ordinary little parish where both forms of the Mass sit side by side, week by week, where people say their prayers and get on with trying to live their lives supported by the beauty and grace of the liturgy.

Others will make very learned and most necessary responses to the Moto Proprio. But I write this because I already know that so many priests and people are casting about looking for guidance. I am among them. In my startled state, I can only suggest that we pray for one another and pray for Francis to be truly a father and a man of holiness to all his children.

Tuesday, 13 July 2021

Catholic Boys Boarding School seeks adventurers


St Peter's Catholic School is looking for boys to join in September with a thirst for life, for learning and for the Faith. To set out on the next part of the adventure of growing up in an environment that will both challenge and support you; large enough to be exciting, small enough to always be among friends.

First and foremost, Saint Peter’s exists as a place to encounter the Living God, who in Jesus Christ, reveals His transforming love and truth. We seek to provide an education centred on Christ, the same Christ Andrew announced to his brother: “We have found the Messiah”. Just as Saint Peter’s life was given radical purpose and direction by his subsequent encounter with Christ, so we labour to allow such an encounter for the pupils in our care: forming their characters in virtue as they deepen their faith and grow in their love of learning, of God, and of neighbour.


True education is directed towards the formation of the human person in view of their final end and the good of that society to which they belong and in the duties of which they will, as an adult, have to share … they should be helped to develop harmoniously their physical, moral and intellectual qualities.                                                       Gravissimum Educationis



The Church views our final end as that which primarily should determine and shape all education, and therefore we place at the heart of our ethos a formation that uncompromisingly considers the ultimate purpose and destiny of each pupil’s life. The formation received within daily College life allows them to discern prudence, to practice temperance, to seek justice and to grow in Faith. 

To achieve this noble end, the character of Saint Peter’s is defined by its:

Community.
As a small fraternity, we live together facing all the joys and challenges that exist in any family. Leading by example, our older pupils naturally mentor, support and encourage the younger ones to create a happy and safe environment in which they can grow in faith, live and learn.  


Liturgy.
The rhythm of each day is defined by the liturgy, we do not simply pay lip service to a "Catholic ethos".  The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, enriched by Gregorian chant, is the source and summit of our life. Within the timetable we provide opportunities for private prayer, daily Rosary devotions, confession, adoration and benediction. 

Curriculum.
Recognising the need for formal accreditation, whilst being acutely aware of the inadequacies of a curriculum constrained by public exams, Saint Peter’s has developed a hybrid approach of a classical curriculum in the Lower School with a provision for publicly examined subjects in the Upper School and Sixth Form. 


Identity.
Saint Peter’s is an international school, and whilst the principal language is English we are by no means restricted to British culture. We have over 10 nationalities represented in the College and celebrate our ‘universality’ in our day to day life. 



Setting. 
We live in an idyllic environment to promote excellent learning. In the midst of wonderful French countryside, we chose Saint Pierre de Maillé for its inspiring tranquility in a world of noise. The numerous hiking trails, world heritage sites, areas of outstanding natural beauty, as well as the magnificent river Gartempe, compliment the historical and religious significance of our small town.    

As each of our pupils is made in the image and likeness of God, and called to eternal communion with Him, at Saint Peter’s we make the development of a knowledge and love of God, the way that leads to Him, and the development of gifts and talents in the service of His kingdom, our guiding priorities.